new wave feminism

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

A quasi-academic look at Feminism, politics & race relations through the lens of a 20-something year old Nigerian American who was born & raised up in the (still) segregated south but has relocated to the "liberal" yet historic & traditional north.
This blog is my space for an interdisciplinary examination of race, gender, class, sexuality - all things intersectional & multi-dimensional.
Feminism the way I see it...



----------------------------------------------
Tip The Blogger?
----------------------------------------------


If you like what you see, and want to support the blog & keep me writing, throw in whatever change you like in the online tip cup. Or send me an ask & tip me in your kind words!
Donations aren't required, but greatly appreciated
Posts tagged "trans"

lalunafemme:

Synopsis:
Approaching his 30’s, Passion, a black trans musician two years into his medical transition, juggles his newfound identity as a black male and the societal expectations that come along with it. Though him and his ska band enjoy local success in Oakland, Ca, Passion is discontent with remaining local and wants to extend the band’s fame beyond the bay area. However, his best friend and band mate, Shields, cannot fully accept his transition which heavily affects the success of the group as he constantly pressures Passion into living stealth and adopting a misogynist demeanor. Afraid of ruining the chances of success for his band and feeling unsure of his own masculinity, Passion begrudgingly begins to closet himself. When he encounters a local queer activist named Uni that reminds him of the beauty of gender fluidity, it propels him to take action in his career as a musician, reconsider his friendship with Shields, and openly embrace his trans identity and non-traditional expression of masculinity.

signal booost

(via crunkfeministcollective)

The other day I got a question about allowing children to transition - since I didn’t have knowledge on the subject I opened it up to tumblr. Here were some of the responses:

aurric:

I think the distinction is that these kids that are transitioning at that age aren’t just letting their kids do it because “it’s what the kids want.” Gender Identity Disorder is something identified and “diagnosed” (for lack of a better term) by a psychologist. Children that are transitioning do so in a guided way; it isn’t just the parents letting their child do this. If the submitter was referring to kids who wear non-gender-conforming clothes, well, kids go through phases. 

Just because your three-year-old boy likes to wear pink shoes or puts on a Disney Princess dress sometimes indicates nothing about his gender identity or sexuality. Gender Identity Disorder does exist in young children and is identifiable even from a young age.

the submitter needs to realize that sexuality and gender are two very different things that manifest differently. Someone who is misgendered, theoretically, never feels comfortable in their own body. Someone who is gay or bisexual has to come to terms with their feelings about others, not themselves … if that makes sense.

anon:

I wish I had transitioned when I was a kid. I was certain I was trans at age 13, and that hasn’t changed in the last 8 years. It would’ve been much easier to transition as a teen, or to at least be put on hormone blockers and transition later. I’m not able to do it now because I’m at a university in a very conservative state, and I don’t have enough money for both hormones and surgery. I think that young trans kids should at least be allowed to have hormone blockers, if not full transition.

crystalsavestheday:

As far as trans* kids go, I know a lot of parents who will start their children off on a slow process, especially if they’re threatening to commit suicide which happens a lot and these kids are very young.

anon:

Regarding the anon who spoke about trans children, and how they would have made the wrong decision as a child. I have to ask - did they go to a trans positive therapist at any point in their childhood? Because transitioning is incredibly, incredibly more difficult as a child, and an adult already has a hard time getting the medical and other support they need. Additionally, children usually don’t get put on drugs until near-puberty, instead ‘simply’ living as their real gender. (cont.)

Essentially, these children will go through a battery of tests - usually more than most adults, at least in America - to make certain they want to actually be a different gender. Once they are determined that yes, they really, really do, they still have to wait for appropriate medical care. Do mistakes happen? Possibly. But they would be incredibly few and far between, and I would guess that the anon would have realized they weren’t trans long before anything medically happened.

The introduction to a new and important series of stories designed to shed light on the plight of transgender WOC in DC. An explanation is below, to read more click the link above.

This year was a bloody one for transgender women of color in Washington, D.C. In late July, Lashai McLean was shot to death 10 blocks away from the office of Transgender Health Empowerment in Northeast D.C. Just 11 days later—and one block away from the scene of McLean’s slaying—Tonya Harrell was shot at but escaped. And in April, Chloe Alexander Moore was physically assaulted by an off-duty police officer.

McLean, Harrell and Moore were just the most recent victims in a sustained pattern of anti-trans violence in the nation’s capitol. Coupled with the acute racial disparities detailed in the landmark national survey “Injustice at Every Turn,”, D.C.’s transgender women of color are carrying the heaviest of loads.

Because violence and terror and discrimination isn’t the sum total of people’s lives, I’ve asked a range of transgender women of color living in D.C. to tell their own stories. I wanted to know everything—the experiences they’ve had with employment, their families, men, housing, girlfriends, spirituality and dance floors. I wanted to hear about how they survive—and thrive. Below is the first in a series of as-told-tos.

feministblackboard:

Five genders

I thought this might be interesting to some of you. This is a group of people who believe that in order to live harmoniously with each other they must all openly accept all five genders. This culture is called Bugi. 

In essense the five genders according to this culture are cismen (oroané), ciswomen (makkunrai), transmen (calalai), transwomen (calabai) and genderqueer (bissu). 

It is sad that westerners are still hung up on the rules of religion and what is considered taboo. On the plus side, it is wonderful to see other cultures moving forward in such a way.

feministblackboard:

This is just an update to a post you perhaps saw earlier on tumblr. 
If you watched or even voted on the controversial breast augmentation prize from Clagary radio stations “Breast Summer Ever” sweepstakes, here’s your update. 
Avery, a musician who also happens to be a male to female trans person, won the contest by a landslide. By 76 percent at that! Her hope upon winning the implants was that she would not have to face the amount of bigotry on a daily basis that she currently does. How do you feel about the contest? Are you alright with what it is doing or do you find it in poor taste? Many, many people entered. Their reasons were very diverse, too. Entrants ranged from women who simply wanted to be bustier, to cancer patients, to a woman who suffered from Gillian-beret syndrome, to Avery. 

feministblackboard:

This is just an update to a post you perhaps saw earlier on tumblr. 

If you watched or even voted on the controversial breast augmentation prize from Clagary radio stations “Breast Summer Ever” sweepstakes, here’s your update.

Avery, a musician who also happens to be a male to female trans person, won the contest by a landslide. By 76 percent at that! Her hope upon winning the implants was that she would not have to face the amount of bigotry on a daily basis that she currently does.

How do you feel about the contest? Are you alright with what it is doing or do you find it in poor taste? Many, many people entered. Their reasons were very diverse, too. Entrants ranged from women who simply wanted to be bustier, to cancer patients, to a woman who suffered from Gillian-beret syndrome, to Avery.
 
The average life span of a transgendered person is twenty-three years. The statistic is shocking, until it begins to make sense. Gender non-conformists face routine exclusion and violence. Transgendered people are disproportionately poor, homeless, and incarcerated. Many of the systems and facilities intended to help low-income people are sex-segregated and thereby alienate those who don’t comply with state-imposed categories. A trans woman may not be able to secure a bed in a homeless shelter, for example. Spade writes that just as the feminist movement tended to “focus on gender-universalized white women’s experience as ‘women’s experience,’” the lesbian- and gay-rights movement has focused primarily on a white, middle-class politic, centered on marriage and mainstream social mores.

Guernica / Trans-Formative Change

Dean Spade is the first openly trans law professor. Meaghan Winter interviews him for Granta.

H/T The Rumpus

(via irunfrombears)

(via gangsofcats-withthumbs-deactiva)