new wave feminism

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A quasi-academic look at Feminism, politics & race relations through the lens of a 20-something year old Nigerian American who was born & raised up in the (still) segregated south but has relocated to the "liberal" yet historic & traditional north.
This blog is my space for an interdisciplinary examination of race, gender, class, sexuality - all things intersectional & multi-dimensional.
Feminism the way I see it...



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Posts tagged "books"
Marriages between black women and white men could be tolerated during slavery because they were so few in number and represented no threat to the white supremacist regime. After manumission they were no longer tolerated. In the state of Kentucky, the Supreme Court was asked to judge insane a white man who desired to marry a female slave he had once owned. Once slavery ended and whites declared that no black woman regardless of her class status or skin color could ever be a “lady”, it was no longer socially acceptable for a white man to have a black mistress. Instead, the institutionalized devaluation of black womanhood encouraged all white men to regard black females as whores or prostitutes. Lower class white men, who had had little sexual contact with black women during slavery, were encouraged to believe they were entitled to access to the bodies of black women.

bell hooks, Ain’t I a Woman (via wretchedoftheearth)

it’s all in the history…

(via notesonascandal)

kemetically-ankhtified:

by: Nah Dove (Temple University)

References

found this while working on a paper for my Black studies class. interesting sources to check out (i’ve read a few: Welsing, Diops, Nobles), for those who are interested.

knowledge is power, especially for black women.

(via diasporicroots)

Currently Reading: Brand Aid - Shopping Well to Save the World
Book Description:

“Has there ever been a better reason to shop?” asks an ad for the Product RED American Express card, telling members who use the card that buying “cappuccinos or cashmere” will help to fight AIDS in Africa. Cofounded in 2006 by the rock star Bono, Product RED has been a particularly successful example of a new trend in celebrity-driven international aid and development, one explicitly linked to commerce, not philanthropy.
In Brand Aid, Lisa Ann Richey and Stefano Ponte offer a deeply informed and stinging critique of “compassionate consumption.” Campaigns like Product RED and its precursors, such as Lance Armstrong’s Livestrong and the pink-ribbon project in support of breast cancer research, advance the expansion of consumption far more than they meet the needs of the people they ostensibly serve. At the same time, such campaigns sell both the suffering of Africans with AIDS (in the case of Product RED) and the power of the average consumer to ameliorate it through familiar and highly effective media representations.
Using Product RED as its focal point, this book explores how corporations like American Express, Armani, Gap, and Hallmark promote compassionate consumption to improve their ethical profile and value without significantly altering their business model, protecting themselves from the threat to their bottom lines posed by a genuinely engaged consumer activism. Coupled with the phenomenon of celebrity activism and expertise as embodied by Bono, Richey and Ponte argue that this “causumerism” represents a deeply troubling shift in relief efforts, effectively delinking the relationship between capitalist production and global poverty.

Currently Reading: Brand Aid - Shopping Well to Save the World

Book Description:

“Has there ever been a better reason to shop?” asks an ad for the Product RED American Express card, telling members who use the card that buying “cappuccinos or cashmere” will help to fight AIDS in Africa. Cofounded in 2006 by the rock star Bono, Product RED has been a particularly successful example of a new trend in celebrity-driven international aid and development, one explicitly linked to commerce, not philanthropy.

In Brand Aid, Lisa Ann Richey and Stefano Ponte offer a deeply informed and stinging critique of “compassionate consumption.” Campaigns like Product RED and its precursors, such as Lance Armstrong’s Livestrong and the pink-ribbon project in support of breast cancer research, advance the expansion of consumption far more than they meet the needs of the people they ostensibly serve. At the same time, such campaigns sell both the suffering of Africans with AIDS (in the case of Product RED) and the power of the average consumer to ameliorate it through familiar and highly effective media representations.

Using Product RED as its focal point, this book explores how corporations like American Express, Armani, Gap, and Hallmark promote compassionate consumption to improve their ethical profile and value without significantly altering their business model, protecting themselves from the threat to their bottom lines posed by a genuinely engaged consumer activism. Coupled with the phenomenon of celebrity activism and expertise as embodied by Bono, Richey and Ponte argue that this “causumerism” represents a deeply troubling shift in relief efforts, effectively delinking the relationship between capitalist production and global poverty.

As seen on The Root:

"Just in time for Women’s History Month, Crystal McCrary has released her latest book profiling the who’s who of influential black women in the 21st century. Inspiration: Profiles of Black Women Changing Our World boasts 30 profiles of prominent black women whose efforts in fine and performance arts, media, music and acting, politics, humanitarianism and more have left an indelible mark on the world, paving the way for women of color. Inspiration is a great read for any and all aspiring female trailblazers."

thequickeningbirthpolitic:

This is a no-holds-barred response to the liberal and conservative retreat from an assertive, activist, and socially transformative civil rights agenda of recent years—using a black feminist lens and the issue of  the impact of recent legislation, social policy, and welfare “reform” on black women’s—especially poor black women’s—control over their bodies’ autonomy and their freedom to bear and raise children with respect and dignity in a society whose white mainstream is determined to demonize, even criminalize their lives.   It gives its readers a cogent legal and historical argument for a radically new , and socially transformative, definition of  ”liberty” and “equality” for the American polity from a black feminist perspective.

The author is able to combine the most innovative and radical thinking on several fronts—racial theory, feminist, and legal—to produce a work that is at once history and political treatise.  By using the history of how American law—beginning with slavery—has treated the issue of the state’s right  to interfere with the black woman’s body, the author explosively and effectively makes the case for the legal redress to the racist implications of current policy with regards to 1) access to and coercive dispensing of birth control to poor black women 2) the criminalization of parenting by poor black women who have used drugs 3) the stigmatization and devaluation of poor black mothers under the new welfare provisions, and 4) the differential access to and disproportionate spending of social resources on the new reproductive technologies used by wealthy white couples to insure genetically related offspring.

The legal redress of the racism inherent in current  American law and policy in these matters, the author argues in her last chapter, demands and should lead us to adopt a new standard and definition of the liberal theory of “liberty” and “equality” based on the need for, and the positive role of government in fostering, social as well as individual justice.

Book reviews for black feminist texts always have a place on my blog

submission from sophistory

Hi! In relation to your post about never really having read the traditional western ‘feminist canon’: I recently had a similar realisation myself, so I ended up making a masterpost of downloadable readers and introductory-type books on the history of feminism and feminist philosophy - including some encyclopedias/glossaries of feminist authors and works, both western and non-western in origin. Just thought I’d send you the link in case you find something there helpful, especially in terms of getting to grips with ye olde ‘obligatory feminist texts’ list.

Thanks!

A while back I came across a master-post of writings from women of color - I might just put both lists on the front page of my blog. (as soon as i dig through my likes and find it =/)

who’s never really read traditional western feminist texts.

But this semester, one of my classes has me reading the entirety of Betty Friedan’s “The Feminine Mystique” and Simone DeBeauvoir’s “The Second Sex.”

This shall be interesting…

AND i’m reading Ariel Levys Female Chauvinist Pigs - I feel like my professor just went down her “obligatory feminists texts” book list for our class…

The mainstream media is ripe with oversexualized images of women of color, and policy often stigmatized and shames this same group of people. Women of color and poor women are blamed for their inability to keep their legs closed and for having too many children. For marginalized groups of women, sex is not linked to pleasure and freedom; it is demonized and used as an example of all the ways in which these women lack self-control. As a result, a lot of conversation around sexual freedom discount the experience of people of color, failing to take into account how much sexual freedom is assumed to hinge on a woman’s privilege—be it because of her race, economic status, or social standing.

Of course, not all women of color are sexualized in the same way. For example, while black women are considered lascivious, always consenting and out of control, Latina[s] are considered exotic or overly sensual and Asian women are considered childish and prude. These particular stereotypes are reinforced through popular culture and pornography (just Google respectively “Asian women,” “black women,” or “Latina women” and then “women” and see what comes up). The common thread here is that nonwhite women’s sexuality is seen as outside the norm of white heterosexuality. It’s therefore something to uniquely desired, manipulated, exploited or controlled. Within this rather toxic climate, being a woman of color who’s in touch with her sexuality is an act of resistance. Pushing past the negative media depictions and still finding a healthy, healing, erotic, and functional sexuality is no small feat.

I have often felt trapped between discourses of sexuality. If I’m overtly sexual, I’m a threat to what it means to be a good, pious South Asian lady and to the white norms of sexuality. As a result, when I am sexual, I am confronting my ethnic community and the norms of white sexuality. Finding a more authentic sexuality that’s just me means pushing past what is considered the appropriate way for me to be sexual based on my race, ethnicity, and gender. This has meant a lot of experimentation, sometimes playing up how “bad” I am or being tremendously secretive about my sexual transgressions (well, clearly not after this book). And it meant sifting through partners and figuring out which ones are a little too obsessed with my being Indian.”

Samhita Mukhopadhyay’s Outdated: Why Dating Is Ruining Your Love Life

Found via: Racialicious 

notesonascandal:

I’ve been reading this book off and on all day. I ABSOLUTELY LOVE IT.

Authentic African-American vernacular, female-POV, glorious illustrations of Black supernatural creatures and fairytale characters. Author’s comments explaining the origins of each tale.

AMAZING.

I wish I could give one to every little Black Girl I know. I’d never seen a Black mermaid before I bought this book. 

Buy one for your favorite Black Girl. Click the picture. 

christmas gift for little sisters? i thiiink soooooo [ok they’re not that little buuut…]

Currently Reading: Streetwise: Race, Class, and Change in an Urban Community by Elijah Anderson
I’m reading it for class - it should be interesting! I’ll be sure to post interesting excerpts and snippits

Description:
In a powerful, revealing portrait of city life, Anderson explores the dilemma of both blacks and whites, the underclass and the middle class, caught up in the new struggle not only for common ground—prime real estate in a racially changing neighborhood—but for shared moral community. Blacks and whites from a variety of backgrounds speak candidly about their lives, their differences, and their battle for viable communities.
"The sharpness of his observations and the simple clarity of his prose recommend his book far beyond an academic audience. Vivid, unflinching, finely observed,Streetwise is a powerful and intensely frightening picture of the inner city.”—Tamar Jacoby, New York Times Book Review"The book is without peer in the urban sociology literature… . A first-rate piece of social science, and a very good read."—Glenn C. Loury, Washington Times
In this ethnographic study of an anonymous Eastern urban community he calls Village-Northton, Anderson delineates the multifaceted elements that form a neighborhood in transition. Northton is predominantly black, its residents poor; Village is racially mixed, economically on the upswing with encroaching gentrification. Where the two communities meet, perhaps overlap, problems are similar for blacks and whites, for old-time residents and newcomers, particularly as services dwindle. The 10-year study addresses racial tension and the roots of alienation and fear through personal stories that emphasize a commonality of concerns about safe streets, housing and education. In this mosaic of urban life, Anderson, sociology professor at the University of Pennsylvania, offers insight for managers and developers of American cities. - Publishers Weekly

Currently Reading: Streetwise: Race, Class, and Change in an Urban Community by Elijah Anderson

I’m reading it for class - it should be interesting! I’ll be sure to post interesting excerpts and snippits

Description:

In a powerful, revealing portrait of city life, Anderson explores the dilemma of both blacks and whites, the underclass and the middle class, caught up in the new struggle not only for common ground—prime real estate in a racially changing neighborhood—but for shared moral community. Blacks and whites from a variety of backgrounds speak candidly about their lives, their differences, and their battle for viable communities.


"The sharpness of his observations and the simple clarity of his prose recommend his book far beyond an academic audience. Vivid, unflinching, finely observed,Streetwise is a powerful and intensely frightening picture of the inner city.”—Tamar Jacoby, New York Times Book Review

"The book is without peer in the urban sociology literature… . A first-rate piece of social science, and a very good read."—Glenn C. Loury, Washington Times

In this ethnographic study of an anonymous Eastern urban community he calls Village-Northton, Anderson delineates the multifaceted elements that form a neighborhood in transition. Northton is predominantly black, its residents poor; Village is racially mixed, economically on the upswing with encroaching gentrification. Where the two communities meet, perhaps overlap, problems are similar for blacks and whites, for old-time residents and newcomers, particularly as services dwindle. The 10-year study addresses racial tension and the roots of alienation and fear through personal stories that emphasize a commonality of concerns about safe streets, housing and education. In this mosaic of urban life, Anderson, sociology professor at the University of Pennsylvania, offers insight for managers and developers of American cities. - Publishers Weekly

Asker Anonymous Asks:
Have you read Ariel Levy's "Female Chauvinist Pigs?" If so, what are your thoughts on her comparing (well, invoking parallels. She makes it explicit that it is not a direct comparison) women who display internalized misogyny as "Uncle Tomming"? Is this a valid parallel, or is it just plain racially insensitive?
newwavefeminism newwavefeminism Said:

I haven’t read it (I haven’t read a lot of things if it wasn’t assigned for class :/) but I don’t fine those type of comparisons very helpful or that they add to discussion… unless she went through great lengths to explain the orgins or the term “uncle tom” and how it relates to her point as oppose to relying on “common knowledge” its probably not the type of comaprison I would support.

But like I said, I haven’t read the book.

But thanks for the question, this is an interesting topic - does anyone who read the book have an opinion on her line of logic?

feministblackboard:

Why dead women sell books 
Have you ever noticed how crime novels have a very high number of female victims? The interesting part of this fact is that a large percentage of the readers of such novels are female themselves. Why do you think that is? A while back I found an article written by one of my favourite authors, Tess Gerritsen, in which she takes a swing at why she believes that is. I have read all of Gerrtisen’s books from both the medical thriller and mystery/thriller series, but at the time the thought of questioning why the victims are very often female never hit me. I wont say any more, but I will send you her essay about the subject and let you make up your own mind- why do you think it is? http://www.murderati.com/blog/2010/8/10/why-dead-women-sell-books.html

feministblackboard:

Why dead women sell books


Have you ever noticed how crime novels have a very high number of female victims? The interesting part of this fact is that a large percentage of the readers of such novels are female themselves. Why do you think that is?

A while back I found an article written by one of my favourite authors, Tess Gerritsen, in which she takes a swing at why she believes that is. I have read all of Gerrtisen’s books from both the medical thriller and mystery/thriller series, but at the time the thought of questioning why the victims are very often female never hit me.

I wont say any more, but I will send you her essay about the subject and let you make up your own mind- why do you think it is?

http://www.murderati.com/blog/2010/8/10/why-dead-women-sell-books.html

Ten years later thousands of working- and middle-class women, fed up with decades of abuse, took tot he streets to protest their mistreatment and demand the right to ‘sit with dignity’. The Montgomery bus boycott, frequently regarded as the spark plug of the modern civil rights movement, was actually the end of a drive chain that ran back into decades of black women’s activism. That supposedly “spontaneous” event [of Rosa Parks refusing to give up her seat] was, in fact, the culmination of a deep history of gendered political appeals - frequently led by black veterans - for the protection of African American women from sexual and physical assault. Only by understanding the relatively hidden history of sexualized violence in Montgomery, Alabama, and African Americans’ efforts to protect black womanhood, can we see that the Motgomery bus boycott was more than a movement for civil rights. It was also a women’s movement for dignity, respect, and bodily integrity.

- At the Dark End of the Street: Black Women, Rape, and Resistance - a New History of the Civil Rights Movement from Rosa Parks to the Rise of Black Power by Danielle L. McGuire

y’all i’m reading a really gr8 book. you should probably check this shit out. it tells the stories of the black womyn activists that are generally reduced to footnotes in mainstream historical accounts of the modern civil rights movement. i was a little offput to find out that the author is a white womyn (our stories are getting told the same way they always do, i suppose), but it’s still super interesting and informative. i would love to know if something like this has been written by black womyn writers!

(via cupcakesnotbombs)

(via bad-dominicana)

Reading an excerpt of this book - chapters 1 & 2 for class
Expect quote bombs
and if you would like a PDF of the 2 chapters, just message me privately your email =)

Reading an excerpt of this book - chapters 1 & 2 for class

Expect quote bombs

and if you would like a PDF of the 2 chapters, just message me privately your email =)

i NEED to read this book

Description:

Jezebel’s sexual lasciviousness, Mammy’s devotion, and Sapphire’s outspoken anger—these are among the most persistent stereotypes that black women encounter in contemporary American life. Hurtful and dishonest, such representations force African American women to navigate a virtual crooked room that shames them and shapes their experiences as citizens. Many respond by assuming a mantle of strength that may convince others, and even themselves, that they do not need help. But as a result, the unique political issues of black women are often ignored and marginalized.

In this groundbreaking book, Melissa V. Harris-Perry uses multiple methods of inquiry, including literary analysis, political theory, focus groups, surveys, and experimental research, to understand more deeply black women’s political and emotional responses to pervasive negative race and gender images. Not a traditional political science work concerned with office-seeking, voting, or ideology, Sister Citizen instead explores how African American women understand themselves as citizens and what they expect from political organizing. Harris-Perry shows that the shared struggle to preserve an authentic self and secure recognition as a citizen links together black women in America, from the anonymous survivors of Hurricane Katrina to the current First Lady of the United States.