new wave feminism

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A quasi-academic look at Feminism, politics & race relations through the lens of a 20-something year old Nigerian American who was born & raised up in the (still) segregated south but has relocated to the "liberal" yet historic & traditional north.
This blog is my space for an interdisciplinary examination of race, gender, class, sexuality - all things intersectional & multi-dimensional.
Feminism the way I see it...



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Posts tagged "body image"

I love how photographers think they can take the same extremely thin, very white, able bodied, blemish free, upper middle class woman - slap some hair dye, glasses and tattoos on them and suddenly you have *revolutionized* female representation.

It’s just a different degree of the same.

The irony is on level “The Onion” right now

Apparently, food and regret always coexist. Thanks twitter ads!

I just received an ask about this above photo.
Do I think it’s a *good* thing… yeah. It’s hard to have anything against the premise that an underwear retailer is making a point to not hire supermodels and to not retouch their images.
Do I think it’s revolutionary, a sign that feminism has won, completely void of problems… not at all.
Don’t get me wrong, I think it’s a good thing that companies are realizing they aren’t allergic to the look of a non-airbrushed body. This is a victory that is probably already making a lot of young lingerie buyers feel empowered/more comfortable.
But we should be careful in making sure we don’t make the mistake to frame this as something that all women are empowered/feel good about. I think it’s worth noting that whenever ad campaigns use body positivity as a marketing strategy they still only show imagery of “acceptable flaws” and “acceptable plus size bodies.”
In short. I think it’s perfectly acceptable to feel like this is positive. I personally am interested to seeing how these types of media campaigns evolve and change media. However, keep in mind that media still operates in a problematic bubble, and to be respectful to the voices of people who might still feel excluded/insulted/left out and rejected by things that others find positive.
The ad does a good job of rejecting absolute perfection. In her latest album Beyonce sings that “perfection is a disease of a nation” and I see a lot of people destroy themselves in order to replicate it. But does this campaign, or any other embrace bodies like mine? Does it embrace the body type of a majority of it’s constituents?
We can celebrate these things, but if we want to go farther and push more - we should support more local/less well known initiatives that highlight bodies of color, dark skinned bodies, fat bodies, trans bodies, dis-abled bodies etc. Letting one overshadow the other will defeat the purpose.

I just received an ask about this above photo.

Do I think it’s a *good* thing… yeah. It’s hard to have anything against the premise that an underwear retailer is making a point to not hire supermodels and to not retouch their images.

Do I think it’s revolutionary, a sign that feminism has won, completely void of problems… not at all.

Don’t get me wrong, I think it’s a good thing that companies are realizing they aren’t allergic to the look of a non-airbrushed body. This is a victory that is probably already making a lot of young lingerie buyers feel empowered/more comfortable.

But we should be careful in making sure we don’t make the mistake to frame this as something that all women are empowered/feel good about. I think it’s worth noting that whenever ad campaigns use body positivity as a marketing strategy they still only show imagery of “acceptable flaws” and “acceptable plus size bodies.”

In short. I think it’s perfectly acceptable to feel like this is positive. I personally am interested to seeing how these types of media campaigns evolve and change media. However, keep in mind that media still operates in a problematic bubble, and to be respectful to the voices of people who might still feel excluded/insulted/left out and rejected by things that others find positive.

The ad does a good job of rejecting absolute perfection. In her latest album Beyonce sings that “perfection is a disease of a nation” and I see a lot of people destroy themselves in order to replicate it. But does this campaign, or any other embrace bodies like mine? Does it embrace the body type of a majority of it’s constituents?

We can celebrate these things, but if we want to go farther and push more - we should support more local/less well known initiatives that highlight bodies of color, dark skinned bodies, fat bodies, trans bodies, dis-abled bodies etc. Letting one overshadow the other will defeat the purpose.

Photoshopping does more than alter our sense of body image in terms of weight. It also portrays false ideals of skin pigment.

pbquads:

eatclean-traindirtty:

bikini-by-summer:

fitnessinspiration1:

jai-liftingweight:

hellyeahyougotthis:

Body scan of 250 lb woman and 120 lb woman. If this isn’t motivation to work out, I don’t know what is! I’m NOT implying that a women needs to weigh 120 lbs…that’s no where near realistic for some people…but it is about health and longevity and the damage obesity causes. Look at the size of the intestines and stomach; how the knee joints rub together; the enlarged heart; and the fat pockets near the brain. Not good.Michelle LeSueur - Energetic practitioner and Nutritionist

I’ve seen this posted a lot on Tumblr but I’m reblogging it again. This is really scary

Think your choice!!!!

Also forever reblog

oh wow..

What gets me is how their ankles are shaped and curved in….

Its so hard to follow blogs that celebrate being healthy and yoga WITHOUT doing things like this.

It’s just not necessary, and it’s offensive. How is this motivation.

If it’s meant to motivate big people - a picture on tumblr comparing a scanned image of their body to a smaller person is the exact opposite of the way to go. Considering most people in their life probably constantly reminds them of how unhealthy they are on a consistent basis. This isn’t motivation it’s just more “look at what you are not and how unnaceptable your current state is.”

If it’s meant to motivate NON big people to work it’s literally just using big people as a scare tactic to work out. “go to the gym because you don’t want to wind up like HER *scary music*.

*sigh* unfollow

(via yogi-health)

Here’s the thing. Despite what thigh-gap thinspiration Pinterest boards would have you believe, most women–nearly all women–have thighs that rub against each other. Especially when working out, which is what your clothes are presumably for.
Melissa Harris-Perry
A letter to Lululemon, on behalf of women whose thighs touch

Apparently H&M doesn’t even use entire models. They’re at the point where they just copy and past various heads on the same computer generated and “completely vitural” body.

-_-‘

So I ran across this long ago, but never posted it. Read & tell me what you think - 

From BlackFemininity.Com:

Call me a pessimist, but at first glance the below report on self-esteem seems quite positive. And generally it would be, when an effort to examine how black women feel about their bodies is all-inclusive of our humanity in equal proportions to all other women in question. But are they truly positive, when the method for forecasting self-esteem puts other women’s context at the center of the model?

The report (from Allure magazine) says:

* African-American and Hispanic women are twice as likely as Caucasian women to report not wanting to change their body in any way.

* A third of African-American women think of themselves as the most attractive person in the room.

African-American men are directionally more likely to embrace and aspire to curviness – they say they want curvier hips and a higher/rounder butt or a larger butt.

Such studies:

- never include or ask women how they feel about complexion, over things like wrinkles.

- never account for black hetero women’s self esteem as it relates to what they will sacrifice in relationships, and the standards and treatment they will accept.

- mentions findings on things such as anorexia, but not how self-esteem deducing  it may be for a male partner to claim his preference for you, not for the beauty of your eyes, smile, facial features, and your heart, but instead, for your nipples, butt, labia, or any other erogenous zone for his personal sexual fulfillment.

- never includes how women may feel about their natural hair texture.

- never begins to examine how women with “rounder” features may feel about their lips, cheekbones, nose shape or facial profile when in the mirror.

- fail to acknowledge that reports of insecurity are severely skewed if said women learned that discussing typical female insecurities is “self-hatred” (as punishment for not conforming to the myth of super-human). Such women would, of course, report more incidents of positivity overall to avoid stigma.

-etc.,

We relate to people (rather average people or celebrities) who discuss their imperfections, over those who view themselves as perfect and lacking any flaws. They are human, like us. In fact, the normal custom is to despise the people who do not and we consider them incapable of human emotions.

I cannot state enough that there are no statistical solutions for socialized problems. What are women, if they don’t have basic things like insecurities and sensitivity in common? We do. They just continuously go unreported.

I think the main value of this article is that is shows us how even the very methodology that goes into creating a study to uncover a greater truth is a product of, and only works to maintain and perpetuate existing systems of dominance and privilege

The Lucky Strike endorsed cigarette diet… because smoking every single time you’re hungry is so much healthier than … just eating regularly.
I hope she has enough lung endurance left after marathon smoking for 5 years straight to actually swim in the pool…

The Lucky Strike endorsed cigarette diet… because smoking every single time you’re hungry is so much healthier than … just eating regularly.

I hope she has enough lung endurance left after marathon smoking for 5 years straight to actually swim in the pool…

Thoughtful & thought-provoking testemonial

thickdumplingskin:

Identity. Noun. “The condition of being oneself or itself, and not another.”

This is something that I’ve struggled with in my life as long as I can remember. I was born to two immigrant parents. One German and One Malaysian-Chinese. 

Since I was young, you could say I lived the “stereotypical” first-generation Asian American childhood. Piano, viola, chinese brush-painting classes, get togethers with “family friends”. Deep down inside I always knew I belonged to my Asian heritage even though I was only half. Yet people were constantly finding ways to take that feeling away from me.

When I was younger, I had a “petite” figure, which my mother could dress me up in nice dresses (that I hated). This all changed when I hit middle school. I grew far taller than my mother, aunts and female cousins. I was the one being called “big boned.” Since my body didn’t have a similar metabolism to other asian girls my age, whenever I would gain weight I would instantly be accosted. This never really bothered me; I was a little insecure but still comfortable with my weight. That is, until I hit high school.  

My freshman year, I went to a school with an accelerated program, renowned both locally and nationally. Naturally, the school attracted a diverse student body. I went in knowing very few people and found myself attached to the familiar. The Asian Girls. A group of six or so girls who had known each other through Chinese school and other various gatherings. I was the tallest, the widest and the most non-stereotypical “Tiny Little Asian Girl.” 

This came to their attention very quickly and was pointed out at every opportunity. To me, it seemed like every time one of them felt they were lacking an aspect of being small, fragile, graceful and adorable, they could point out that I was far less. Five plus years later, I still wonder why I put myself through that shattering of self-esteem. The worst of it came when one of the girls flat out told me to my face, “You are not like us, you are not Asian”. It seemed from that moment onwards, I have fought even harder to become one of them. Tiny, skinny, porcelain-faced, jet-black straight hair. This wound festered to the point of attempting to starve myself. Making myself miserable to please those who used me to boost their own self-esteem.

Even to this day, I’ve struggled with my identity. Yes, I am not a “Tiny Little Asian Girl.” I’m proud to be an Asian-American Woman, regardless if I fit a stereotype or not. My best advice to girls who are struggling with their own identities is to cultivate your own image of yourself. Don’t let others or the media put a label on what you “should be.” Be yourself. Love yourself. Peace, Love, APIA.


Anonymous

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Slightly unrelated - Special K Red Berry is pretty decent.

Sexism and Body shaming still sucks ass though

(via maisoncetacea)

Think of all the women you know who will not allow themselves to be seen without makeup. I often wonder how they feel about themselves at night when they are climbing into bed with intimate partners. Are they overwhelmed with secret shame that someone sees them as they really are? Or do they sleep with rage that who they really are can be celebrated or cared for only in secret?
bell hooks in Communion: The Female Search for Love

Since its summer, I’m going to put up this Modern Lady video about Bikini Season!

thedailywhat:

Barbie IRL of the Day: People talk and talk about how unrealistic Barbie’s 39-18-33 measurements would be if she were a real live girl. Hamilton College student Galia Slayen took the talk a step further and actually built a real life-size Barbie.
Slayen, who dressed her 6-foot-tall Barbie doll in a size 00 skirt she wore during her battle with anorexia, says she created the model to get people taking about eating disorders, but doesn’t blame her illness on the plastic icon’s distorted proportions alone.
“She’s one small factor, an environmental factor,” Slayen told TODAY.com. “I’m blond and blue-eyed and I figured that was what I was supposed to look like. She was my idol. It impacted the way I looked at myself.”
[huffpo / msnbc / dlisted.]

fun fact of the day, Galia goes to my school. I actually blogged about this during NEDA week when this Barbie was put on display.

thedailywhat:

Barbie IRL of the Day: People talk and talk about how unrealistic Barbie’s 39-18-33 measurements would be if she were a real live girl. Hamilton College student Galia Slayen took the talk a step further and actually built a real life-size Barbie.

Slayen, who dressed her 6-foot-tall Barbie doll in a size 00 skirt she wore during her battle with anorexia, says she created the model to get people taking about eating disorders, but doesn’t blame her illness on the plastic icon’s distorted proportions alone.

“She’s one small factor, an environmental factor,” Slayen told TODAY.com. “I’m blond and blue-eyed and I figured that was what I was supposed to look like. She was my idol. It impacted the way I looked at myself.”

[huffpo / msnbc / dlisted.]

fun fact of the day, Galia goes to my school. I actually blogged about this during NEDA week when this Barbie was put on display.

this clearly hits close to home. My moms from Nigeria and spent a good part of my earlier years (maybe still a little) bleaching her skin. Going out in the sun was an issue for her. But what are your choices when you understand that darker skin automatically makes you feel less valuable? When you internalize so many comments and images that make it clear that your dark skin is a set back.

Mikeisha Simpson covers her body in greasy white cream and bundles up in a track suit to avoid the fierce sun of her native Jamaica, but she’s not worried about skin cancer.

The 23-year-old resident of a Kingston ghetto hopes to transform her dark complexion to a cafe-au-lait-color common among Jamaica’s elite and favored by many men in her neighborhood. She believes a fairer skin could be her ticket to a better life. So she spends her meager savings on cheap black-market concoctions that promise to lighten her pigment.

"If we really want to control the spread of the skin-bleaching virus, we first have to admit that there’s an epidemic of color prejudice in our society," said Carolyn Cooper, a professor of literary and cultural studies at the University of the West Indies, writing in The Jamaica Gleaner newspaper.

Felicia James, a 20-year-old resident of the Matthews Lane slum, said skin bleaching just makes her feel special, like she’s walking around in a spotlight. She was taught to bleach by her older sister and her friends

Obviously, i’m in a gloomy mood this morning. Internalized racism and self hatred isn’t going to make it better