new wave feminism

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A quasi-academic look at Feminism, politics & race relations through the lens of a 20-something year old Nigerian American who was born & raised up in the (still) segregated south but has relocated to the "liberal" yet historic & traditional north.
This blog is my space for an interdisciplinary examination of race, gender, class, sexuality - all things intersectional & multi-dimensional.
Feminism the way I see it...



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Posts tagged "black history"

An awesome comic over from Colorlines. Wonderful coming of age tale of a black female activist in a world where Civil Rights and Black History are told from a masculine lens…

My favorite panel was the one with the Eldridge Cleaver reference… I def don’t understand how that book was published as an important civil rights work while no one was like “wait a minute… that’s not okay…”

oh wait, yes I do

Black women rarely had hold of the microphone, sometimes because of sexism, but they wrote the speeches, they organized the marches, planned the boycotts, took part in the sit-ins and demonstrations, and were beaten, arrested, sexually assaulted, and dehumanized for their efforts alongside the men.

It Did Not Start With Stonewall: Black Lesbian Elders Tell Their Herstories: Our revolution didn’t start with Stonewall. African American lesbian elders tell the tales of gay New York life in Harlem, Brooklyn and the Bronx before the world-altering Stonewall rebellion. In this clip they recall, raids and suffocating laws and racial discrimination faced within the gay community.

(via strugglingtobeheard)

crackconchlife:

First All Female African-American Flight Crew.

Captain Rachelle Jones, first officer Stephanie Grant and flight attendants Diana Galloway and Robin Rogers made history on February 12th when their Atlanta-based Delta Connection carrier departed from Atlanta to Nashville, Tennessee.

(via brownpoet)

submitted by grrrl-powr : 

I just really want your opinion on this. It’s kind of sad that I know this guy personally.

thats how pervasive anti-black racism is… it convinces everyone that there is only one type of “aint bout shit” black person who can’t help but live a pathological life of destruction. Especially when there are next to zero non-stereotypical/non-negative representations of Black Americans in the mass media. Unfortunately, some blacks who  who don’t fit the popular, erroneous stereotype, instead of thinking “i guess the way we construct African Americans is flawed, I should challenge this!” buy into the pervasive anti-black sentiment of this country & instead become self righteous, judgmental specal snowflakes.

happy black history month -_-

[graphic] So much early scholarship, if you really look into it, is pretty sickening, as is based off of bigotry and scientific racism. These are the people early college students were studying and praising…
racemash:

thespunkywallflower:

J. Marion Sims is called “the Father of Gynecology” due to his experiments on enslaved women in Alabama who were often submitted as guinea pigs by their plantation owners who could not use them for sexual pleasure. He kept seven women as subjects for four years, but left a trail of death and permanently traumatized black women. Anarcha was one of the women Sims experimented upon. A detailed history of this monster is in Harriet Washington’s book, Medical Apartheid.Sims believed that Africans were numb to pain and operated on the women without anesthesia or antiseptic. The procedures usually happened this way. Black female slaves who were guinea pigs would hold one subject down as Sims performed hysterectomies, tubal ligation, and other procedures to examine various female disorders.Sims also performed a host of operations on other slave populations. The following excerpt details his “practice” on enslaved infants.Sims began to exercise his freedom to experiment on his captives. He took custody of slave infants and, with a shoemaker’s awl, tried to pry the bones of their skulls into proper alignment.
 

You guys should really google him. 
(if you click the link, I did it for you)

[graphic] So much early scholarship, if you really look into it, is pretty sickening, as is based off of bigotry and scientific racism. These are the people early college students were studying and praising…

racemash:

thespunkywallflower:

J. Marion Sims is called “the Father of Gynecology” due to his experiments on enslaved women in Alabama who were often submitted as guinea pigs by their plantation owners who could not use them for sexual pleasure. 

He kept seven women as subjects for four years, but left a trail of death and permanently traumatized black women. 

Anarcha was one of the women Sims experimented upon. A detailed history of this monster is in Harriet Washington’s book, Medical Apartheid.

Sims believed that Africans were numb to pain and operated on the women without anesthesia or antiseptic. The procedures usually happened this way. 

Black female slaves who were guinea pigs would hold one subject down as Sims performed hysterectomies, tubal ligation, and other procedures to examine various female disorders.

Sims also performed a host of operations on other slave populations. The following excerpt details his “practice” on enslaved infants.

Sims began to exercise his freedom to experiment on his captives. He took custody of slave infants and, with a shoemaker’s awl, tried to pry the bones of their skulls into proper alignment.
 

You guys should really google him

(if you click the link, I did it for you)

A piece published yesterday, on the anniversary of Rosa Park’s historical act of resistance.

Rosa Parks is one of the most familiar yet least known figures in the history of the civil rights movement. She was the woman who sparked the Montgomery Bus Boycott, the first successful mass protest of the modern movement.

On December 1, 1955, Parks’ refusal to give up her seat on a city bus and subsequent arrest resulted in a boycott led by a previously unknown, local minister, the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King. Parks’ arrest and the community-driven protest that followed drew national and international media attention and led to the desegregation of Montgomery’s buses in December of 1956, making Parks an icon of the movement.

Mischaracterized as a simple woman who chose not to stand because she had tired feet, often Parks’ long history of activism is erased from our collective consciousness. Parks served as an active member of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People beginning in the early 1940s, working on a voter registration campaign, leading the local NAACP Youth Council, and attending a leadership conference organized by civil rights visionary, Ella Baker.

It would be Parks’ work as a young activist in the NAACP that would lead her to investigate a horrible incident of abduction and rape that had taken place in her hometown of Abbeville, Alabama.

A recent historical study, Danielle McGuire’s At the Dark End of the Street, details how Parks risked her own life to spearhead a movement on behalf of Recy Taylor, a young African American wife, mother, and sharecropper who had been seized by seven white men and raped at gunpoint in 1944.

Although local authorities would refuse to indict anyone for the crime, this case would animate Parks’ quest for justice.

Visit the link to read the rest of this story!

ohlookhistory:

Sarah “Saartjie” Baartman, one of at least two Khoikhoi women called “The Hottentot Venus.”  She was taken to Europe as a Scientific Curiosity: “Baartman had unusually large buttocks and genitals, and in the early 1800s Europeans were arrogantly obsessed with their own superiority, and with proving that others, particularly blacks, were inferior and oversexed.”(southafrica.info)

She was a slave. She was brought to Britain in 1810 and exhibited to the public; she was allowed to cover her genitals, but her clothes were skin-tight.  Her the question of her freedom or slavery caused a scandal, as slavery on English soil was abolished in 1807.  Official inquires into the subject were inconclusive

She was later sold to a Frenchman and exhibited in Paris, where, among other indignities, she was displayed by an animal trainer and later had to turn to prostitution.  She died in 1815. 

French naturalist Georges Cuvier, who had examined her while she was still alive, furthered his scientific efforts after her death.  He “made a plaster cast of her body, then removed her skeleton and, after removing her brain and genitals, pickled them and displayed them in bottles at the Musee de l’Homme in Paris.”(southafrica.info)  They remained on display until 1974. 

In 2002 her remains were finally returned to South Africa.  

Just a followup from my last post…. the legacy of the hottentot exists to this day in the way we frame black hyper-sexuality. 

sanelevox:

saartjie baartman lives…think about it.

I wonder how many people know & understand who Saartji Baartman (Sarah Baartman) is…?

sanelevox:

saartjie baartman lives…think about it.

I wonder how many people know & understand who Saartji Baartman (Sarah Baartman) is…?

notesonascandal:

queennubian:

The Mammy Caricature (Aunt Jemima) a history of why this is offensive.

Real Mammies

“From slavery through the Jim Crow era, the mammy image served the political, social, and economic interests of mainstream white America. During slavery, the mammy caricature was posited as proof that blacks — in this case, black women — were contented, even happy, as slaves. Her wide grin, hearty laugher, and loyal servitude were offered as evidence of the supposed humanity of the institution of slavery.

This was the mammy caricature, and, like all caricatures, it contained a little truth surrounded by a larger lie. The caricature portrayed an obese, coarse, maternal figure. She had great love for her white “family,” but often treated her own family with disdain. Although she had children, sometimes many, she was completely desexualized. She “belonged” to the white family, though it was rarely stated. Unlike Sambo, she was a faithful worker. She had no black friends; the white family was her entire world. Obviously, the mammy caricature was more myth than accurate portrayal.”

I will never forget how angry I got when some guy called me “Mammy” because I was working as a Nanny for a white family. People really don’t understand the plight Black women who work in positions of domesticity and care. 

Fuck. I’m getting hot thinking about it now. 

twiggyz:

History passed on to me

(via dynastylnoire)

whb2:

Three woman who helped change the America!

Rosa Parks did far more then refuse to move to the back of the bus.

Ida B Wells led the protest against lynching and was one of the original founders of the NAACP.

Septima Clark began organizing anti-racist activities in the Deep South in the 1920’s

(via diasporicroots)

fyeahblackhistory:

Women’s liberation and African freedom struggle
Thomas Sankara
 
Below is an excerpt from Women’s Liberation and the African Freedom Struggle by Thomas Sankara, one of Pathfinder’s Books of the Month for January. Sankara was the central leader of the popular democratic revolution in the West African country of Burkina Faso (formerly Upper Volta) from 1983 to 1987. This excerpt is from a talk he gave to several thousand women commemorating International Women’s Day on March 8, 1987, in Ouagadougou, the country’s capital.

BY THOMAS SANKARA 
‘The question of women’s equality must be in the minds of all decision-makers, at all times, and in all the different phases of conceiving and executing plans for development. Conceiving a development project without the participation of women is like using only four fingers when you have ten. It’s an invitation to failure.

In the ministries responsible for education, we should take special care to assure that women’s access to education is a reality, for this reality constitutes a qualitative step toward emancipation. It is an obvious fact that wherever women have had access to education, their march to equality has been accelerated. Emerging from the darkness of ignorance allows women to take up and use the tools of knowledge in order to place themselves at the disposal of society. All ridiculous and backward concepts that hold that only education for males is important and profitable, and that educating women is an extravagance, must disappear in Burkina Faso.

Parents should accord the same attention to the progress of their daughters at school as they do to their sons, their pride and joy. Girls have proven they are the equals of boys at school, if not simply better. But above all they have the right to education in order to learn and know—to be free. In future literacy campaigns, the rate of participation by women must be raised to correspond with their numerical weight in the population. It would be too great an injustice to maintain such an important part of the population—half of it—in ignorance.

In the ministries responsible for labor and justice, texts should constantly be adapted to the transformation our society has been going through since August 4, 1983, so that equality between men and women is a tangible reality. The new labor code, now being drawn up and debated, should express how profoundly our people aspire to social justice. It should mark an important stage in the work of destroying the neocolonial state apparatus—a class apparatus fashioned and shaped by reactionary regimes to perpetuate the system that oppressed the popular masses, especially women.

How can we continue to accept that a woman doing the same job as a man should earn less? Can we accept the levirate* and dowries, which reduce our sisters and mothers to common commodities to be bartered for? There are so many things that medieval laws continue to impose on our people, on women. It is only just that, finally, justice be done….

As we go forward, our society should break from all those feudal conceptions that lead to ostracizing the unmarried woman, without realizing that this is merely another form of appropriation, which decrees each woman to be the property of a man. This is why young mothers are looked down upon as if they were the only ones responsible for their situation, whereas there is always a guilty man involved. This is how childless women are oppressed due to antiquated beliefs, when there is a scientific explanation for their infertility, which science can overcome.

In addition, society has imposed on women norms of beauty that violate the integrity of their bodies, such as female circumcision, scarring, the filing of teeth, and the piercing of lips and noses. Practicing these norms of beauty is of dubious value. In the case of female circumcision, it can even endanger a woman’s ability to have children and her love life. Other types of bodily mutilation, though less dangerous, such as the piercing of ears and tattoos, are no less an expression of women’s conditioning, imposed by society if a woman wants to find a husband. Comrade militants, you look after yourselves in order to win a husband. You pierce your ears and do violence to your body in order to be acceptable to men. You hurt yourselves so that men can hurt you even more! …

Comrades, no revolution—starting with our own—will triumph as long as women are not free. Our struggle, our revolution will be incomplete as long as we understand liberation to mean essentially that of men. After the liberation of the proletariat, there remains the liberation of women.

Comrades, every woman is the mother of a man. I would not presume, as a man and as a son, to give advice to a woman or to indicate which road she should take. This would be like giving advice to one’s own mother. But we know, too, that out of indulgence and affection, a mother listens to her son, despite his whims, his dreams, and his vanity. And this is what consoles me and makes it possible for me to address you here. This is why, comrades, we need you in order to achieve the genuine liberation of us all. I know you will always find the strength and the time to help us save our society.

Comrades, there is no true social revolution without the liberation of women. May my eyes never see and my feet never take me to a society where half the people are held in silence. I hear the roar of women’s silence. I sense the rumble of their storm and feel the fury of their revolt. I await and hope for the fertile eruption of the revolution through which they will transmit the strength and the rigorous justice issued from their oppressed wombs.

Comrades, forward to conquer the future.
The future is revolutionary.
The future belongs to those who struggle.
Homeland or death, we will win!’

Click here for more on the writer

(via black-culture)

crankyskirt:

minijustliving:

lafillenoir:

This is a photo of the first Black girl to  attend an all white  school in the United States—Dorothy Counts—being  jeered and taunted by  her white, male peers. This photo encompasses a  lot of things that I  really hate: prejudice, ignorance, racism, sexism,  inequality…

powerful picture.

I used to have the above photo, as well as this one of Elizabeth Eckford, taped up on the wall in my room, as part of a sort of “tough-hearted women and femmes” altar-like thing. Resistance isn’t always this graceful; it doesn’t always wear a neat dress and endure the slings and arrows of ignorant, mean-spirited enemies without spitting back in rage. But when it does appear in this way, my heart breaks wide open.
Here’s to Dorothy, and Elizabeth, and Rosa, and all those others who I could sit and name all day. Inside those dresses are quiet warriors - Dorothy’s eyes say it all.

crankyskirt:

minijustliving:

lafillenoir:

This is a photo of the first Black girl to attend an all white school in the United States—Dorothy Counts—being jeered and taunted by her white, male peers. This photo encompasses a lot of things that I really hate: prejudice, ignorance, racism, sexism, inequality…

powerful picture.

I used to have the above photo, as well as this one of Elizabeth Eckford, taped up on the wall in my room, as part of a sort of “tough-hearted women and femmes” altar-like thing. Resistance isn’t always this graceful; it doesn’t always wear a neat dress and endure the slings and arrows of ignorant, mean-spirited enemies without spitting back in rage. But when it does appear in this way, my heart breaks wide open.

Here’s to Dorothy, and Elizabeth, and Rosa, and all those others who I could sit and name all day. Inside those dresses are quiet warriors - Dorothy’s eyes say it all.

(via diasporicroots)