new wave feminism

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A quasi-academic look at Feminism, politics & race relations through the lens of a 20-something year old Nigerian American who was born & raised up in the (still) segregated south but has relocated to the "liberal" yet historic & traditional north.
This blog is my space for an interdisciplinary examination of race, gender, class, sexuality - all things intersectional & multi-dimensional.
Feminism the way I see it...



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Posts tagged "advertising"
I just received an ask about this above photo.
Do I think it’s a *good* thing… yeah. It’s hard to have anything against the premise that an underwear retailer is making a point to not hire supermodels and to not retouch their images.
Do I think it’s revolutionary, a sign that feminism has won, completely void of problems… not at all.
Don’t get me wrong, I think it’s a good thing that companies are realizing they aren’t allergic to the look of a non-airbrushed body. This is a victory that is probably already making a lot of young lingerie buyers feel empowered/more comfortable.
But we should be careful in making sure we don’t make the mistake to frame this as something that all women are empowered/feel good about. I think it’s worth noting that whenever ad campaigns use body positivity as a marketing strategy they still only show imagery of “acceptable flaws” and “acceptable plus size bodies.”
In short. I think it’s perfectly acceptable to feel like this is positive. I personally am interested to seeing how these types of media campaigns evolve and change media. However, keep in mind that media still operates in a problematic bubble, and to be respectful to the voices of people who might still feel excluded/insulted/left out and rejected by things that others find positive.
The ad does a good job of rejecting absolute perfection. In her latest album Beyonce sings that “perfection is a disease of a nation” and I see a lot of people destroy themselves in order to replicate it. But does this campaign, or any other embrace bodies like mine? Does it embrace the body type of a majority of it’s constituents?
We can celebrate these things, but if we want to go farther and push more - we should support more local/less well known initiatives that highlight bodies of color, dark skinned bodies, fat bodies, trans bodies, dis-abled bodies etc. Letting one overshadow the other will defeat the purpose.

I just received an ask about this above photo.

Do I think it’s a *good* thing… yeah. It’s hard to have anything against the premise that an underwear retailer is making a point to not hire supermodels and to not retouch their images.

Do I think it’s revolutionary, a sign that feminism has won, completely void of problems… not at all.

Don’t get me wrong, I think it’s a good thing that companies are realizing they aren’t allergic to the look of a non-airbrushed body. This is a victory that is probably already making a lot of young lingerie buyers feel empowered/more comfortable.

But we should be careful in making sure we don’t make the mistake to frame this as something that all women are empowered/feel good about. I think it’s worth noting that whenever ad campaigns use body positivity as a marketing strategy they still only show imagery of “acceptable flaws” and “acceptable plus size bodies.”

In short. I think it’s perfectly acceptable to feel like this is positive. I personally am interested to seeing how these types of media campaigns evolve and change media. However, keep in mind that media still operates in a problematic bubble, and to be respectful to the voices of people who might still feel excluded/insulted/left out and rejected by things that others find positive.

The ad does a good job of rejecting absolute perfection. In her latest album Beyonce sings that “perfection is a disease of a nation” and I see a lot of people destroy themselves in order to replicate it. But does this campaign, or any other embrace bodies like mine? Does it embrace the body type of a majority of it’s constituents?

We can celebrate these things, but if we want to go farther and push more - we should support more local/less well known initiatives that highlight bodies of color, dark skinned bodies, fat bodies, trans bodies, dis-abled bodies etc. Letting one overshadow the other will defeat the purpose.

ad-busting:

I refuse to obsess about my age, and I refuse to accept the idea that looking younger is better.

(via socio-logic)

pretty goes with everything!
This Aerie commercial that just aired. yeah, not entirely convinced…

An interesting (yet monochromatic) guide explaining the varying levels of sexual objectification in ads.

Sociological Images:

What is sexual objectification?  If objectification is the process of representing or treating a person like an object (a non-thinking thing that can be used however one likes), then sexual objectification is the process of representing or treating a person like a sex object, one that serves another’s sexual pleasure.

How do we know sexual objectification when we see it?  Building on the work of Nussbaum and Langton, I’ve devised the Sex Object Test (SOT) to measure the presence of sexual objectification in images.  I proprose that sexual objectification is present if the answer to any of the following seven questions is “yes.”

Black Women In Advertising

Things I come across as I write this essay about how the media constructs/reflects hegemonic gender norms in terms of masculinity…

Killing Us Softly 4 (2010) - 1/2 

[click here for link to the second half]

In this update of her pioneering Killing Us Softly series, Jean Kilbourne takes a fresh look at how advertising traffics in distorted and destructive ideals of femininity. Killing Us Softly 4 stands to challenge a new generation of students to take advertising seriously, and to think critically about popular culture and its relationship to sexism, eating disorders, and gender violence.

According to Miss Representation, the organization that launched the [#NotBuyingIt] hashtag, women make up about half of the Super Bowl’s audience and they’re more likely than men to tune in for the ads, rather than the game. Miss Representation notes that while they wield more household purchasing power than their male partners, 90 percent of women think advertisers don’t understand them. Super Bowl ads do an especially good job of missing the point by acting as though dudes are the only ones watching.

Twitter Talks Back to Sexist Super Bowl Ads | Mother Jones

This is largely what confuses me about sexist advertising. When you want someone’s money why would you silence or ignore them?

Also read: Ten Lady Innovators Best Buy Could’ve Put in Its Super Bowl Ad

(via meganwest)

(via motherjones)

Learning about the depth of stratification and exploitation can be demoralizing and depressing. However, it is imperative to realize that one can’t attempt to effectively solve a problem unless one understands the problem.

motherjones:

Pro-life activist Missy Reilly Smith describes her 2010 congressional campaign, which consisted entirely of running 30-second advertisements depicting aborted fetuses. If you live in Minneapolis-St. Paul, Cincinnati, St. Louis, Iowa, or New Hampshire, those ads could soon be coming to a television set near you. And as Tim Murphy reports, there’s nothing the FCC can do about it.

wow. the post just got more and more abhorrent as I kept reading…

Found this image courtesy of Clutch Magazine, with the following commentary:

While I nodded my head at each of items listed on the comic, I wondered if advertisers can ever effectively market things to African Americans, and specifically Black women, without falling back on tired stereotypes (uh, hello sassy Tide girl).

Although I understand the need to want to target specific demographics, when will companies realize that Black women shop, go to restaurants, and clean their homes just like everyone else?

What kind of advice would you give advertisers looking to market to Black women? 

( Comic originally from Kiss My Black Ads)

what do you think?

1950’s advertising and folgers coffee…

Because the best way to sell coffee is to convince housewives that brewing that other stuff will make your husband not love you anymore….

I remember seeing this ad in a course. Soap that can get things so imperially white - that it can even scrub off that pesky dark skin…

I remember seeing this ad in a course. Soap that can get things so imperially white - that it can even scrub off that pesky dark skin…

Vintage advertising always puts in perspective the place the country was a few short decades ago…

So i go to college on a full scholarship because my school is great with meeting financial need. There was an army recruiter on my high school campus trying his hardest to convince me that my scholarship wasn’t really free and that I’d need to pay for college some way and I needed to join the army.

If my armed forces is staffed by people who were manipulated into believing that this was their only chance at having a future… thats not ok. The military doesn’t need to be the first option of talented, yet poor & disadvantaged POC - but it becomes that when we convince them that their only alternative is serving. Hey, its great to serve and make that decision on your own… but I just don’t like convincing someone to dedicate their lives to things through mis-representation…

#randomthoughtsatnight

(via revolutionaryminded)