new wave feminism

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

A quasi-academic look at Feminism, politics & race relations through the lens of a 20-something year old Nigerian American who was born & raised up in the (still) segregated south but has relocated to the "liberal" yet historic & traditional north.
This blog is my space for an interdisciplinary examination of race, gender, class, sexuality - all things intersectional & multi-dimensional.
Feminism the way I see it...



----------------------------------------------
Tip The Blogger?
----------------------------------------------


If you like what you see, and want to support the blog & keep me writing, throw in whatever change you like in the online tip cup. Or send me an ask & tip me in your kind words!
Donations aren't required, but greatly appreciated
Recent Tweets @
Posts tagged "Discrimination"
The problem for women thus is not simply that they are different from men, whether biologically or in some other way. The problem for women-and what limits their chances for equality-is that they are different from men in a social world that disguises what are really just male standards or norms as gender-neutral principles. In other words, the difficulties women face stem from the fact that they are different from men in an “androcentric” or male-centered world

Sandra Lipsitz Bern 

Hey all! I just sat through this lecture and wanted to share my notes. 

About the speaker.

Kenyon Farrow is the former executive director of Queers for Economic Justice. He can be found at http://kenyonfarrow.com/

He also wrote the piece: Is Gay Marriage Anti-Black?

Keep in mind these are my notes from a lecture, so if you have burning questions go ahead and ask but I might not be able to expand upon/explain ALL aspects of Kenyon’s points. This was written live as he spoke so they are the product of me trying to catch all of his points and write them down, so there is a lot of paraphrasing going on. I hope my notes make sense haha…


Is Gay The New Black

-       Kenyon Farrow

Over the last 3 years the LGBT community has been “a buzz” with this phrase “Gay is the new black!”

-       The idea that gay is the new black, while not new, exploded in the mainstream discourse recently with the election of Obama and the passage of Propisitions 8.

-       The phrase infers that  1) the struggles of the LGBT is tantamount to the struggles of Blacks in the civil rights movement and that 2) sexual orientation and gender identity is the “NEW” social oppression.

But is gay actually the new black or is this political deceit?

-       While homophobia still exists, gay is NOT the new black. OLD black is the new black

-       Many in the white LGBT community felt betrayed by the “black community” when exit polls revealed that 70% of black voters in California voted in favor of prop. 8. – Especially when this was right after they went and voted for Obama. Arguments: “we did you a favor by voting for Obama” (as if Mccain and Palin was ever an option anyway)

-       Dan Savage, white gay sex columnist, wrote the next morning a post on “black homophobia.” Savage: “I’m tired of pretending that the handful of racist white gay men is more of a problem than homophobic blacks are to the entire gay community. I’ll eat my shorts if white gay & lesbian voters voted for Mccain at the rates that blacks did for Prop. 8” [it turns out, it was later revealed that it was really just 57% of the black population that voted against – numbers that were significantly closer white & Hispanic voter rates.] also, black voters only made up 7% of the population of California! If every black person didn’t show up that day, Prop. 8 still would have passed.

-       Ever since prop. 8 “gay is the new black” became the LGBT rally cry – insinuating that race is no longer a factor in America. – However, the phrase is a shallow read of the real problems POC deal with in terms of racism in America. It also reveals the issues within the LGBT movement in dealing and understanding issues of racism.

The “no on 8” campaign

-       Outside political consultants came in and completely disregarded the input of local LGBT residents

-       LBGT POC offered to organize in their own communities, translate documents into Spanish etc… couples offered to go on TV to discuss how the proposition will affect their families… they were either dismissed or given too few resources.

-       The campaign strategy was “don’t talk about race, religion or sex.” The strategy was to intentionally ignore those issues. Also, the strategy was to target middle class white female voters.

-       When people feared that Obama’s candidacy would harm the campaign, so it began became an issue of “how do we suppress black voters” AS OPPOSE TO just hiring someone to target black communities (until 7 days before the election). Black LGBT organizations that desperately wanted to get involved were ignored & given no resources to spread the word to their communities.

-       Farrow: if the strategy was to target middle class white women voters was it really a surprise that a majority of black voters didn’t vote against the proposition. Now I’m not saying that ANYONE should have voted for the proposition but the assumption that blacks went en mass to vote for prop 8 is untrue?

Gay as the “new second class citizenship”

-       Lets be clear, prop. 8 is not the same as the Dred Scott decision – where it was decided by the supreme court that black people were not citizens, were slaves, and that congress can’t abolish slavery

-       While there is DEFINITELY discrimination against LGBT communities, and sexuality is criminalized – it does not hold the same precedent as saying “you’re not a citizen and have no right to sue for citizenship in court” Supreme court officers went on record about the inferiority of black people. The Dred Scott case has never been overturned.

-       People feel that this comparison to Dred Scott is unfair, but that is exactly how blacks feel when wealthy white gays compare their experiences to the civil rights movement.

What should the national LGBT agenda be focused on?

-       Unfortunately, within LGBT activist groups, at times the focus is so much on marriage that when transgender or homosexual bring up the fact that they are not covered by insurance or fear getting kicked off of their insurance once they report that they are transgender they are just told “we don’t care – we’re focusing on marriage.”

-       While data shows that those in the LGBT community suffer disproportionably in healthcare, living conditions etc… than their white counterparts, the national LGBT agenda (in terms of laws proposed and points raised) makes it seem as though everyone who is LGBT is white, wealthy and lives in urban areas. It would help the community a lot more to instead of addressing marriage, to fight for health insurance coverage, anti-poverty initiatives, housing & homelessness etc… [used example, a lesbian with no job isn’t going to be helped by the ability to marry.  The best she can do is pawn her wedding ring]

- The homophobic prison system

-  Where are the LGBT movements demanding a higher minimum wage of the employee freedom of choice act? The anti-discrimination act is fine, but it doesn’t help LGBT prospective employees who have a significantly higher chance of getting their résumé’s pulled for showing their affiliation with LGBT organizations or having “ethnic” sounding names.

-       While DADT was a big step, one must examine the role the military plays in promoting homophobic violence all across the world.


I don’t think white people, generally, understand the full meaning of racist discriminatory behaviors directed toward Americans of African descent. They seem to see each act of discrimination or any act of violence as an “isolated” event. As a result, most white Americans cannot understand the strong reaction manifested by blacks when such events occur. They feel that blacks tend to “over-react.” They forget that in most cases, we live lives of quiet desperation generated by a litany of daily large and small events that whether or not by design, remind us of our “place” in American society.
The Continuing Significance of Race by Joe R. Feagin
When you cut facilities, slash jobs, abuse power, discriminate, drive people into deeper poverty and shoot people dead whilst refusing to provide answers or justice, the people will rise up and express their anger and frustration if you refuse to hear their cries. A riot is the language of the unheard.

Dr Martin Luther King  (via zeitgeistmovement)

His crusade. The KING they wont show.

(via howtobenoladarling)

(via blackamazon)

Our Nation’s workforce includes more women than ever before. In households across the country, many women are the sole breadwinner, or share this role equally with their partner. However, wage discrimination still exists. Nearly half of all working Americans are women, yet they earn only about 80 cents for every dollar men earn. This gap increases among minority women and those with disabilities.

Pay inequity is not just an issue for women; American families, communities, and our entire economy suffer as a result of this disparity. We are still recovering from our economic crisis, and many hardworking Americans are still feeling its effects. Too many families are struggling to pay their bills or put food on the table, and this challenge should not be exacerbated by discrimination.

Non-Discrimination is Non-Negotiable

(via cupcakewarriorboss-deactivated2)

Recently a powerful tool for analysis—really a breakthrough, in my opinion—came in the form of a sociological study, “The impact of light skin on prison time for black female offenders.” I suspect that because it’s academic—you have to buy it to read the whole thing—and because it’s wonky as hell, this Villanova University study didn’t receive a quarter of the attention idiotic party promoters, tweeps and rappers like Yung “Dark Butts” Berg do when they floss their color bias.

But the key finding in this study of more than 12,000 black women imprisoned in North Carolina between 1995 and 2009 is that those who were classified as light skinned by one or more corrections officers during intake served 12 percent less time than dark skinned prisoners. Along with height, weight, build, hair and eye color, there’s literally a color code—0 for non-light skin and 1 for light skin. (And lest you think light-skinned women prisoners in the study committed less serious crimes than their dark-skinned sistren, the study controlled for crucial factors including type of arrest, previous record, recidivism and prison behavioral record.)

partyprofessor:

 I hate when girls say this. You do know you are a girl, right? Saying you hate your own gender shows such a deep degree of brainwashing; society has degraded women (that includes you) so long that you eagerly curse your own gender. Saying you hate “other” girls and don’t give a fuck about them does not make you special or like “one of the guys”. If a gay man proclaimed “I hate gay men and I can give a fuck less about most of ‘em”, would we think “hell yeah, gays are so annoying, right on”? No, we’d think he was schizophrenic, or in denial.

 Hating your on gender does not make you exempt to the discrimination, stereotypes and oppression girls receive, it only means that you fight all of those things alone. Even though you hate me and could give a fuck less about me, I still fight for your rights. Instead of attacking how girls act, you should attack the society that forces them to act that way (catty, shallow, gossipy; I’m assuming this is why you hate other girls, unbeknownst that most of these traits are forced upon women by society’s gender roles and propelling of stereotypes). Women are hated enough; we don’t need to hate each other too.

This is important for a few reasons

1) Everyone needs to be educated. We live in a society that places value on certain gendered performances. Not only does this favor one group over the other, but it tricks the second group into thinking the they they are treated is perfectly okay.

2) For some reason, it seems super legit when other women make fun of femininity and women over all. You don’t get a free pass at being ignorant just because you’re being ignorant about people in your group.

3) We always put women against each other. Life isn’t Jerry Springer so we can stop with the constant cat fights. Women care about things other than being jealous of other women, so can we introduce other tropes into the discourse? If i see another “Sarah Palin vs. Michelle Bachman” article… ugh What kind of nonsense is this?

Women are capable of caring about real issues everyone, lets start acting like we’re finally able to accept that as fact 

(via lunagemme)

BET investigated her sexual harassment claim and said that the story couldn’t be corroborated, but no one even bothered to interview an employee who witnessed the incident. Eventually, Dorman was replaced with a man and told the company was “going in a different direction.”

Dormen says, “I’m now pregnant and without a job, and I don’t know what I’m going to do.” She’s suing the company for gender and pregnancy discrimination, and her lawyer says they’ll prove she was let go, “because she had the guts to stand up against sexual harassment.”

Didn’t like BET anyway…

Let me add context to this.

Essentially a group of women are suing Walmart for discrimination. Walmart isn’t denying this, instead they are arguing that compensation should ONLY be awarded to the women named in the suit, as opposed to all their female employees. (I think this is what’s going on.)

its nice to be aware of what goes on behind closed doors with the corporate world.

(via stfukyriarchy-deactivated201112)

something i found on Sociological Images:

Women are now outperforming men in terms of educational attainment, earning the majority of bachelor’s degrees, though notice the number of degrees in engineering/computer science earned by women hasn’t increased since 1998:

However, women still make less than men at each level of educational attainment:

While we’re at it, can we stop trivializing decency in discourse by labeling it ‘political correctness’? Avoiding discriminatory and hurtful language isn’t some partisan posture. It’s just a basic step in not being a dickhead. Characterizing black men as rapists of white women isn’t a daring rebellion against oppressive thought police, it’s just racist.

Evolution, rape, ovulation, and how to get your opinions labeled “Science.” | Holly, The Pervocracy

THANK YOU for so perfectly articulating why the current use of the phrase “politically correct” drives my ass up the fucking wall! 

(via feministlibrarian)

YES THANK YOU. URGHHH. When people bandy about the phrase “political correctness” it just flags up the fact that they think I should be prostrate with delight and gratitude that they’re not calling me slurs.

(via haterina)

THIS.

(via malefeminist)

*applause*

(via feniceargento)