new wave feminism

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A quasi-academic look at Feminism, politics & race relations through the lens of a 20-something year old Nigerian American who was born & raised up in the (still) segregated south but has relocated to the "liberal" yet historic & traditional north.
This blog is my space for an interdisciplinary examination of race, gender, class, sexuality - all things intersectional & multi-dimensional.
Feminism the way I see it...



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reclaimingthewhitepeopletag:

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reclaimingthewhitepeopletag:

stand-tall-ladies:

Currently feminism seems to be a term without any clear significance. The anything goes” approach to the definition of the word has rendered it practically meaningless. What is meant by “anything goes” is usually that any woman who wants social equality with men regardless of her political perspective (she can be a conservative right-winger or a nationalist communist) can label herself feminist.” - bell hooks

Yesterday, recording artist and world-renowned entertainer Beyoncé Knowles released a new song titled “Bow Down/I Been On”. Although I will admit I am a casual listener and appreciator of Beyoncé’s music, I was extremely disappointed with the new track. I was disappointed not only for reasons related to musicality, but more importantly I disturbed by the lyrics and the message of the song. The latter point is what inspired me to make this blog and will be the focus of my post.

I began this post with one of my favorite quotes from one of the foremost feminist theorists, bell hooks. In this quote, hooks is interrogating what feminism is and how define feminism. In particular, she calls into question of the lack of definition and political meaning in the broad and loose way we “define” feminism and instead, offers a succinct and powerful definition of feminism: a movement to end sexist oppression. Given these definition, I wince at people who incessantly advocate for Beyoncé as a “feminist icon” when she continues to produce music with terribly problematic lyrics. This time no amount of cheesy, feel-good tracks like “Run The World (Girls)” can excuse the internalized sexism and misogyny rife in the latest Beyoncé track.

Aside from repeatedly yelling “bow down bitches”, the song also contains lyrics such as “I know when you were little girls / You dreamt of being in my world / Don’t forget it , don’t forget it / Respect that, bow down bitches”. Apparently, Beyoncé thought the appropriate response for young women who admired her and looked up to her was to call them misogynistic slurs and demand they genuflect in her presence. Has showing mutual love and appreciation for fellow women become too difficult? Beyoncé is a successful recording artist and a savvy businesswoman and entrepreneur. She’s married to of one of most powerful music moguls and she’s the mother of a beautiful one-year old girl. With this level of success why would she need to produce track that denigrated other women to praise her success in an industry where misogyny is pervasive? 

Is it just a sad reality that in our highly patriarchal music industry, women expressing mutual love for one another doesn’t sell albums the way women degrading each other can? From Beyoncé’s new track to Rihanna’s celebration of her violent relationship with Chris Brown to Azealia Banks “cunt”-laden tracks and malicious internet beefs with fellow female rappers to virtually every song produced by Nicki Minaj, misogyny is for sale and these women are capitalizing on it. Tragic part of Beyoncé’s recent foray into internalized sexism is she is still hailed by many as a “feminist”. Giving an interview in which you discuss the importance of pay equity (which is hardly a radically feminist position) doesn’t excuse you calling other women “bitches” and “tricks”. I realize there are those who argue they are reclaiming these slurs in the same way the n-word was reclaimed by African-Americans. However, the way in which Beyoncé and other artists use these gendered slurs are not intended to be empower. Calling yourself “a bad bitch” is reclaiming a slur, but degrading other women by saying “bow down bitches” is still misogynistic, whether the person uttering those lyrics is Beyoncé or [insert one of a cadre of sexist, misogynistic rappers here].

I, for one, am completely bothered by the casual misogyny in popular music produced by female artists. The recording industry is tragically way too rife with sexism (i.e. the slut-shaming of Taylor Swift and the fat-shaming of Adele) and for women in the industry to be contributing to that sexism adds insult to injury. As Madeline Albright once said “There is a special place in hell for women who don’t help other women.” I agree patriarchy has told women for millenniums to “bow down bitches”, so for a well-respected women like Beyoncé to reproduce these sexist notions infuriates me.

I wanted to end by requesting that no one interpret this as an attack on Beyoncé  I have no ill-feelings towards her, I am just hoping that artists like Beyoncé can produce music that continues to celebrates women rather than tearing us down. I refuse to support this type of music and I refuse to complicit by remaining silent to the misogyny in these lyrics.

From Beyoncé’s new track to Rihanna’s celebration of her violent relationship with Chris Brown to Azealia Banks “cunt”-laden tracks and malicious internet beefs with fellow female rappers to virtually every song produced by Nicki Minaj, misogyny is for sale and these women are capitalizing on it.”

Apparently all the examples she gave about women profiting off of misogyny in the music industry all coincidentally involved Black women. 

My post was about gender, sexism, misogyny, and feminism, which have nothing to do with race or racism. Please do not derail my post with race-baiting because I would never make a racist post. I made this post to talk about sexist lyrics, which affect ALL women regardless of color.

My post was about gender, sexism, misogyny, and feminism, which have nothing to do with race or racism”…..because there’s no such thing as racialized misogyny? How do you quote bell hooks and make a comment like that?

so a lot happened on tumblr yesterday…

(via )

  1. muchanimal-veryfeminism-wow reblogged this from newwavefeminism and added:
    "My post was about gender, sexism, misogyny, and feminism, which have nothing to do with race or racism. Please do not...
  2. ohaiight reblogged this from newwavefeminism and added:
    *le sigh*
  3. in-in-between-between reblogged this from newwavefeminism and added:
    Scumbag OP doesn’t even bat an eye at the misogynoir in her own post… Sigh…
  4. rosenguildencrantzstern reblogged this from newwavefeminism and added:
    The OP literally only called out black women Why don’t you talk about “Work Bitch”? Or any other vastly misogynistic dog...
  5. occupythedisco reblogged this from isabelthespy and added:
    w e l p
  6. portmanteaurian reblogged this from isabelthespy and added:
    how not to do pop music commentary
  7. isabelthespy reblogged this from lastbutnotleast
  8. lastbutnotleast reblogged this from newwavefeminism and added:
    Reblogging now as an example of the kind of commentary you won’t be seeing over the next few days about “Work Bitch.”
  9. cyantificdiscovery reblogged this from harmonymeadows
  10. harmonymeadows reblogged this from newwavefeminism
  11. i-dont-need-anyone-now reblogged this from angrywocunited
  12. likeaprettymelody reblogged this from angrywocunited
  13. angrywocunited reblogged this from peachjames and added:
    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ THANK YOU!!!!!!!!
  14. unlearningeverything reblogged this from owning-my-truth
  15. mirandaadria reblogged this from owning-my-truth
  16. grrraknil reblogged this from peaceshannon
  17. sun-flowerings reblogged this from peaceshannon
  18. peaceshannon reblogged this from owning-my-truth
  19. saturnineaqua reblogged this from owning-my-truth